Thread Rating:
  • 1 Vote(s) - 5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Room correction
#1
Someone's got to mention it, surely?

Bearing in mind the comment I read on another thread about Devialet being reluctant to add room correction because of the complexity of the measurement process…

It would be great for Devialet to work with Acourate or Dirac so that the filters built by those programs could be implemented directly on the amplifier in real time. That would at least get the measurement and analysis part of the process out of Devialet's remit.

From my point of view that would seem a better solution than SAM because it's solving the end-to-end problem rather than just a part of it. Not that they are mutually exclusive, of course.
Wilson Benesch Full Circle, Sonos ZP90 (Cullen modified), Devialet 440 Pro, Kaiser Chiara
Reply
#2
+100!! Smile
PS Audio P3, Shunyata ΞTRON Alpha Digital/Lessloss DFPC Signature/Furutech power cables, Paul Hynes SR7EHD-MR4, Roon, Sonore microRendu/SoTM sMS-200, Curious USB cable, Audioquest Diamond RJ/E ethernet, Mutec MC-3+ USB, Shunyata ΞTRON Anaconda Digital XLR AES/EBU, Devialet Expert 250 Pro, Nordost Tyr Reference LS cables, Von Schweikert VR-5 SE Anniversary Edition, Anti-Mode Dual Core 2.0, JL Audio Fathom F112. More detail here.

The Netherlands


Reply
#3
I agree completely!
Linn LP12 - Melco  N1A - Devialet 200 - Kef LS50 - DSpeaker Antimode 8033s-II - Linn Melodik Subwoofer

Bavaria
Reply
#4
My thoughts when I heared from Devialet by mail some months ago that room correction isn't on the road map any longer. Sent them a mail back but got no answer. Obviously they do not want to discuss that with the owners. Instead of that a stupid SAM voting and even more 'funny' reasons against room correction. Unbelievable. And unsatisfactory.
Reply
#5
I prefer SAM over room correction anyway, I don't want a completely flat frequency response. If you have problems in your room then buy some acoustic material or learn how to place your speakers better Wink
Reply
#6
I sympathize with that view. If (and it's a big "if") you can use acoustic materials (bass traps etc) to adjust your in-room FR, then IMO it's a better way to go than DSP correction.

SAM does something rather different from DSP correction. The idea of SAM is to force the FR of the speaker output to match the FR of the speaker input. It's a great idea. I've only heard it once, with B&W 805Ds, and it was remarkably effective.

Matt

Sonos Connect (W4S) > DSpeaker Antimode 2.0 > Sanders Magtech > Martin Logan Montis
Sonos Connect (W4S) > Devialet 200 > Vivid V1.5
Silver Phantoms (just the two)
London
Reply
#7
I'm wondering if people saying they don't need DRC have full range loudspeakers, perfect rooms/studio's or ever even measured the bass response/RT60's of their rooms! If not: careful, the truth could hurt! Wink

I myself did treat my room with a full surface acoustical ceiling, RPG Modex bass trap, very heavy rug, but would need massive amounts/volumes of absorbing basstraps or RPG Modex like resonant panels to tame the RT60 of (sub)bass. DSP/DRC combined together with room treatments is, at least to me, the best/most effective solution.
PS Audio P3, Shunyata ΞTRON Alpha Digital/Lessloss DFPC Signature/Furutech power cables, Paul Hynes SR7EHD-MR4, Roon, Sonore microRendu/SoTM sMS-200, Curious USB cable, Audioquest Diamond RJ/E ethernet, Mutec MC-3+ USB, Shunyata ΞTRON Anaconda Digital XLR AES/EBU, Devialet Expert 250 Pro, Nordost Tyr Reference LS cables, Von Schweikert VR-5 SE Anniversary Edition, Anti-Mode Dual Core 2.0, JL Audio Fathom F112. More detail here.

The Netherlands


Reply
#8
(11-Jun-2014, 21:20)Ekmanc Wrote: I prefer SAM over room correction anyway, I don't want a completely flat frequency response. If you have problems in your room then buy some acoustic material or learn how to place your speakers better Wink

I agree. My listening room is also used as a musicians practice room. Musical instruments sound completely natural in here without computer correction ;-). It is my firm belief and experience that our ears compensate for bass room effects, since they exist in all rooms and always have. The sound of musical instruments played in my room does not need correction and nor does my hifi.
Correcting for one place in a room also makes the sound more uneven elsewhere in the room. I suppose if one has a small room, only one person listens and they never move and the speakers can not be placed somewhere appropriate then some sort of correction may be needed. Higher frequency anomalies can give odd effects too which are not easily corrected digitally so need intelligent acoustic solutions. It can never compensate for poor speakers in acoustically unsuitable locations. Clue: how many concert halls have the piano in a corner?

Many years ago I did some acoustic measurements in rooms and halls (I did noise and vibration research as a first job) and the frequency response measured in different locations in the room varied hugely yet, unless there was a powerful echo (which there was in a small cluster of seats in the Royal Albert Hall before it was treated) listeners correct for these variations more or less immediately in their heads, otherwise there would be only one small area of useable seats in a concert hall.

I spent some time positioning my speakers and sorting the room when I first built it.
Getting the room acoustics good is very much more important IMHO than applying a sticking plaster to an amputation by using computerised room correction, IMHO.
What is more it will cost less than some of the foo cables being discussed elsewhere and make a very much more worthwhile difference IME.

The one small concession I would accept is a huge subwoofer which may, by necessity, be positioned completely wrongly in the room from an acoustic POV may well justify using some sort of correction device.
Just my opinion and experience.
Devialet Original d'Atelier 44, Goldmund Reference/T3f /Ortofon A90, Goldmund Mimesis 36+ & Chord Blu, iMac/Air, Meridian Control 15, Lynx Theta, Tune Audio Anima, Goldmund Epilog 1&2, REL Studio. Dialog, Silver Phantoms, Branch stands, copper cables (mainly).

Reply
#9
(11-Jun-2014, 21:20)Ekmanc Wrote: I prefer SAM over room correction anyway, I don't want a completely flat frequency response. If you have problems in your room then buy some acoustic material or learn how to place your speakers better Wink

You don't typically target a flat response. The target curve that you apply is your choice however based on long standing research, the B&K curve is a good place to start.

Please see the seminal paper: http://www.bksv.com/doc/17-197.pdf
Reply
#10
I finally got the feedback directly from Devialet that room correction will be available by Q3 2015!
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)